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Flood Preparedness

Flooding Preparedness

Floods are the most common natural disaster in the United States. Failing to evacuate flooded areas or entering flood waters can lead to injury or death.  Know your risk, protect your home and plan your supplies and evacuation route. Texans can also follow the GLO for updates on social media (TwitterInstagramMediumFacebook, and YouTube).

For flood insurance click here

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BE PREPARED, STAY PREPARED

Know Your Risk - Visit FEMA's Flood Map Service Center to know types of flood risk in your area.  Sign up for your community’s warning system. The Emergency Alert System (EAS) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Weather Radio also provide emergency alerts.

Preparing for a Flood

Make a plan for your household, including your pets, so that you and your family know what to do, where to go, and what you will need to protect yourselves from flooding. Learn and practice evacuation routes, shelter plans, and flash flood response. Gather supplies, including non-perishable foods, cleaning supplies, and water for several days, in case you must leave immediately or if services are cut off in your area.

In Case of Emergency

Keep important documents in a waterproof container. Create password-protected digital copies. Protect your property. Move valuables to higher levels. Declutter drains and gutters. Install check valves. Consider a sump pump with a battery.


Flood Insurance

Most homeowners and renters insurance policies do not cover flood damage, and flood insurance policies don’t automatically renew.

While an inch of water in your home might not seem like a lot, it’s enough to cause over $25,000 worth of damage.

There are a variety of hidden risks that can put your house in danger of flooding, like new housing developments or changes in weather patterns. Flood insurance is a surefire way to protect your home, even when it doesn’t face the obvious risks for flooding.

With flood insurance, you’ll have one less thing to worry about when a flood damages your home or belongings. And while the process of recovering may seem daunting, flood insurance makes it possible.

Flood Insurance Resources


Staying Safe During A Flood

  • Evacuate immediately, if told
  • Monitor road conditions using http://drivetexas.org. Never drive around barricades. Local responders use them to safely direct traffic out of flooded areas.
  • Contact your healthcare provider If you are sick and need medical attention. Wait for further care instructions and shelter in place, if possible. If you are experiencing a medical emergency, call 9-1-1.
  • Listen to EAS, NOAA Weather Radio or local alerting systems for current emergency information and instructions regarding flooding.
  • Do not walk, swim or drive through flood waters. Turn Around. Don’t Drown!
  • Stay off bridges over fast-moving water. Fast-moving water can wash bridges away without warning.
  • Stay inside your car if it is trapped in rapidly moving water. Get on the roof if water is rising inside the car.
  • Get to the highest level if trapped in a building. Only get on the roof if necessary and once there, signal for help. Do not climb into a closed attic to avoid getting trapped by rising floodwater.


Staying Safe After A Flood

Pay attention to authorities for information and instructions. Return home only when authorities say it is safe.

  • Avoid driving except in emergencies.
  • Wear heavy work gloves, protective clothing and boots during clean up and use appropriate face coverings or masks if cleaning mold or other debris.
  • People with asthma and other lung conditions and/or immune suppression should not enter buildings with indoor water leaks or mold growth that can be seen or smelled. Children should not take part in disaster cleanup work.
  • Be aware that snakes and other animals may be in your house.
  • Be aware of the risk of electrocution. Do not touch electrical equipment if it is wet or if you are standing in water. Turn off the electricity to prevent electric shock if it is safe to do so.
  • Avoid wading in floodwater, which can be contaminated and contain dangerous debris. Underground or downed power lines can also electrically charge the water.
  • Use a generator or other gasoline-powered machinery ONLY outdoors and away from windows.

 
Additional Resources